Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Jon Michael give love to Dixie Kitten. 

It has been 11 months since we agreed to bring in Thoroughbred Dixie Kitten, a former race horse and long time brood mare. She didn't have any value to most people because she was in poor shape nutritionally and had severe founder. Her owner was paying board to keep her at a local farm but he moved out of state for his job. The local farm told him of Dixie's condition and wanted to have her euthanized. After all, she was used up. She had a 3 year old baby at her side and had lost a baby not long before we were called. 

She is a very sweet mare. She is one of everyone's favorites. She is also a heart breaker. We have worked so hard trying to keep her comfortable. There are days when she is down more than she is up. There are days when she walks around and seems like we are helping her get better, then she lays down and seems like it is hopeless. 
You can see the crack where frequent abscesses break out
Same on this foot, asbcesses often.














We had a few sets of radio graphs done to compare if our time and efforts, along with very tender loving care, have helped. Dr Ken Marcella, Dr Kerri Porter and Dr Christine Murray have seen her, blocked her feet and made great suggestions as to how to help Dixie. Farrier John Stikes and barefoot trimmer Jan Hester have trimmed Dixie's feet. We have wrapped her feet, soaked them, cleaned them, picked them and put on numerous products to help.
She gets well, or at least seems better then gets such terrible abscesses she goes down again. 

Are we making her suffer? Do we value life so much that we block seeing the suffering? It is such a hard decision to make. We want the best for Dixie. Want her comfortable. Believe me, this is a serious discussion at the barn and a serious discussion with myself at 3 am when I lay there weighing the options. Euthanasia is a serious choice, no turning back. 

After 11 months, we had hoped for more progress. We are not giving up yet. We have spoken with the Vetrixinc company, provider of extracellular matrix (ECM) technologies about injection Dixie's feet with the matrix. They helped SaveTheHorses rescue horse, Chevelle, who we brought in from Louisianna after he was hot by a car and was at animal control in need of help. The Vetrix people are consulting with veterinarians and we are hoping she may be a good candidate and that is provides us the miracle we are hoping for! Say a Prayer for Dixie.













Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Bugg Update is Great!

Our little Bugg an is doing well. It really was tough and go. Every morning as I went into the barn, I held my breath hoping I'd find a happy pony,not one on the groups struggling for his life. Your prayers and good wishes worked. 

He is slowly gaining weight but his hydration was the most concerning and that is now at normal, which is excellent.



He is getting lots of love from the volunteers. He loves every human and animal he comes in contact with. 



Just a golly good pony! 


Thank you for caring! 

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

No! No! No! We Have No Room For Another Horse!

That is what I said, NO! And I meant it!
Honestly, we have no room for another horse. Period! 

I was actually sending an email telling someone telling them, I can't take their horses right now, because we have no room, but that I would be happy to help in any way I can. I  answered the knock at the door and that changed everything.

Then as my friends told me about a small, frail horse just moved to the pasture they lease, about 4 days ago, I had to find a place for him. It had to be immediately. I honestly think he would have died today sometime. Yes he was malnourished when he got to the 35 acre pasture. He was able to at least eat grass but the water is at a creek at the edge of the property. It seems he didn't make it there at all. He was extremely dehydrated, extremely weak. My friends have been giving him a little feed and they did last night, too. Then went around and feed their own horses. By the time all horses were fed, they came back to check on him and he had the grain stuck in his mouth. There wasn't enough moisture in his saliva to move the grain down his throat. They literally had to put their hand in his mouth and remove it. It make me want to cry. It made me say 'Yes'. 

You can see how dehydrated he is here. 

The land owner called the owner of this horse and gave us permission to take him. I really should have it all in writing but it couldn't wait. We can really get in trouble for doing it all orally but we couldn't leave him there. Today, paperwork will be signed.
no muscle, not fat, no energy

So just before dark, we hooked up the trailer and road up to Jasper. We found him standing in the clearing, head down, but happy to see us. I think he knew we were there to help. We slowly and steadily helped him down the hill to the gate. He wasn't able to walk in a straight line at all. He was that weak. He was covered with rain rot on his skin and has a sunburned nose. Once we got him to the trailer we dosed him with electrolytes to give him a much needed boost. 
 
He was an emergency. He would have died.


One the way home, I spoke with Dr Hugh Worsham from Foxdale Equine, about the condition of this guy. He was on call in case we needed him to come during the night if he wasn't hydrating.
 
Covered in rain rot.


He road well as we slowly made the trip back to the farm. He was happy to see horses when he arrived. He's really sweet. We gave him a nice cool hosing in the wash rack to get his body temperature down. He had lice, too. The poor guy had no nutrition to fight anything. We put him in a stall with some nice alfalfa hay and a big bowl of alfalfa soup with minerals.  He loved slurping on it.  

This has to be painful.

He is doing good this morning, bright eyed and whinnying. More soupy mix, more minerals, salts, vitamins and he will slowly recover unless his organs took a toll from the dehydration. The next few weeks will be touch and go. All we can do it our best and offering everything to overcome his poor condition. I am not sure the owner will give him up. Hopefully she will let us at least keep him until he is healthy and get a new start on life. We are time-sharing a stall for him, yes, imagine, Time-share stalls. Hey, it works!

The volunteers already all agreed his name should be Bugg. He has great big, sweet soft eyes that beg for love! He is getting lots of love today!

It is what we do. WE are Rescue! 
(That is a collective WE, including you!)

Thank you for your constant help, support, prayers and good thoughts. They keep us going, they keep us strong.





Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Boston Marathon and Buggs

Last year, while we were all mourning the Boston Marathon bombing with the rest of the county, here in our horse community, we had our own sadness. 

We took in a mare from animal control hoping to find her a good home. Tracy Hunter agreed to foster her. She was very thin and in need of good nutrition. As time passed, the mare gained weight and Tracy had a suspicion that Bugsy was in foal. After a vet check, an ultrasound showed no foal. Bugsy continued to gain weight and became uncomfortable. Tracy called the vet again and this time confirmed the pregnancy. Bugsy was not a happy horse. She was getting everything she needed but seems unhappy. 
Feb 2013 and 2 months to go, Bugsy was growing bigger.
Tracy watched Bugsy gain weight at a rapid speed. After another vet check a few months later, it was confirmed Tracy was right, Bugsy was in foal. Once you know a horse is in foal, you look at her everyday, wondering if today may be the day. Bugsy seemed to be uncomfortable every day. Tracy gave her hugs and kisses but it couldn't take away the uneasy feeling something was wrong. The more miserable Bugsy was, the more Tracy was concerned. It became daily posts about Bugsy until the day came Bugsy was really in labor. Tracy, her daughter, Maddie and Jackie, who are all horse savvy were there to help. It wasn't going well. Bugsy was having a hard time, she was in obvious distress. Humans hands were there to tenderly help the foal be delivered. Another panic moment when the umbilical cord broke and the newborn foal was hemorrhaging. Humans hands again there to help. Many horses are left alone to have their babies but Tracy had the instinct to keep a close watch on this one, thankfully so. 


Bugsy was also bleeding. It was hard to tell if it was just from the birth or was she hemorrhaging as well. She surely was not a normal mare because she was not acknowledging her newborn as her instincts would call her to do. As she stood a few feet from her foal, her eyes were glazed. Her body trembling and her heart rate and respiration rising along with her temperature. The vet was on her way but it would be a while before she arrived. She told us what medication to give her to help make Bugsy comfortable but it didn't ease any pain for sweet Bugsy. Our hearts were aching for her. To stand their helplessly and watch was painful. All we could do it try and be gentle, stroke her and reassure her it would be better soon. 
Bugsy  quietly looked down at her new baby and gave her a quiet tender whinny but she didn't have the strength to do more than that. Not knowing if Bugsy would survive, Tracy started milking Bugsy to get the needed colostrum Baby Buggs would need to survive. A baby bottle was given to the baby and momma was milked again. 
Bugsy was suffering. The closest large animal hospital was 3 hours away and there is no way Bugsy would survive the trip. One the vet arrived, she knew the only way to relieve her suffering was to let her go peacefully. Now Baby Buggs was an orphan and her survival was up to us. Colostrum is so important the first 12 hours after birth, we had to put out a call for colostrum, fresh or frozen, because we felt that we didn't get enough into the foal even though Bugsy gave us 30 ounces, it was not enough. 


 Horse lovers sent out the word and we soon found 80 ounces of frozen colostrum nearby. Tracy set up a mattress in the stall and Maddie cuddled up with baby Buggs to keep her warm and give her a bottle every hour. To raise an orphan, you have to be dedicated,,,Sleepless nights!



Buggs sleeping in his bed. 
No Momma but still needs milk!
The next morning Baby Buggs' bloodwork was good, one less worry but we had to organize to get 24 hour humans to take the place of the mare. Baby Buggs was transported to the SaveTheHorses farm. Everyone volunteered to spend time with this little cutie. 
Everyone's heart was captivated by this little orphan.

She was happy to get all the attention she was being showered with. Everyone couldn't get enough of her cuteness! She is thriving on human love and good care giving.


 Our biggest problem is that she thinks she is human. She has no interest in horses. Why should she? They did nothing for her. It was the humans that gave her milk, gave her attention and loved on her. We hoped teaching her to lead may give her the idea that she was a horse.

Natalie asked her to take a walk.

Look at Buggs today... 
Beautiful young mare Buggs
As we still weep for Bugsy, we are happy that our little miracle is thriving in a good home. But every year, when we memorialize the Boston Bombings, We will also remember the sweet mare, Bugsy, and offer a silent prayer for her also.

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Dixie Kitten


Look at her now! She has been at the Rescue Farm a short time.
Dixie Kitten has wounds from laying down. 

A thoroughbred mare born February 20, 1998.  Bred to run and win. Born in Kentucky, home to many thoroughbreds.  She won over $110,000 in her racing career. Then her journey is not clear. She may have changed hands several times. She had been bred many times, and her last foal died. Maybe the stress from that loss caused her to severely founder. When SaveTheHorses was called, we were told she wasn't taken care of at the boarding stable. We really don't know what happened to her but we knew she needed help. We couldn't leave her and she laid down more than she stood up because of the pain. Her xrays look terrible but we are following Dr Marcella's advice and trying to keep her comfortable. She's a darn sweet mare. She deserved a change and we are going to give her that chance. 

Friday, October 18, 2013

So Many Horses!

So many horses! 
SaveTheHorses has been so busy with horses, it is hard to find the time to type anything. I forced myself today because I know you all care and love the horses and support what we do...Save Horses!

We recently saved an older horse the owner didn't really want. He went to get two riding horses and was told he had to take the old skinny gelding. He put all three in a pasture but the older guy had special needs, like daily feeding! Even more than once a day, 3 or 4 times would have helped but he really wanted the two other horses who were easy keepers and decided to put the gelding down. A caring neighbor god involved and called SaveTheHorses. We had no room for him so the frantic posting began. It didn't take long to find him a home. People are good, especially people who love horses. 
Bob the gelding


Fearing this old horse would be dead, I went and brought him to the rescue farm for a few days. He was located right near the farm in Cumming, GA. We moved a few horses around so he could start getting the car he needed.  We called him Bob. He really didn't seem to care what we called him as long as he had food and hay in front of him. He is super sweet. 
His new loving home is south of Atlanta and he is now called Gentle Ben. Sometimes we just have to do what is right. Glad we did. It changed his life. It would have been dead by now. 


Cumming, GA

Monday, July 29, 2013

Believe! I do believe.  I believe doing good comes back to you. It is how I have lived my life as long as I can remember. It is the way I run the rescue farm. I know people who plan in great detail but not me, I use my gut feeling, or intuition. 
(Wikipedia gut feeling, or gut reaction, is a visceral emotional reaction to something
I smell the roses, I see the beauty in everything.

Sometimes I am down to my last few donation dollars, have tons of bills to pay and someone hands me a check or donates a car to sell or offers to pay on a feed or vet bill or donates hay. I believe it happens because I did something good; a good deed, a good thought, a word of encouragement.

When bad things happen, I try to understand and learn how to make things better. I was recently trying to help a lady who has many animals and is getting into a better place after living in her car and letting her dogs take over her home. She also has horses. Her animals are not starving but it was hard for her and now it is getting better. She now has a safe home, run ins for her dogs and lovely pasture for her horses. One horse was a stallion, sweet but not handled. She had an older mare who the stallion attacked so gelding was necessary. I see it always as necessary anyway.
Vets planning on how to dart the stallion.

Thursday, two experienced vets, a dart gun, a vet tech and myself finally caught the stud and the gelding procedure went quite uneventful. It was clean and fast. When he started to awaken from the sedation, one vet held the lead rope at his head, the other his tail. He was too unsteady. The vet got him to lay back down. The horse kept trying to get up even as the vet held tightly on to the lead. The horse flailed and rolled around. There were puddles filled with water, guide wires from a  security light, fencing and other dangers around but the vet held on. The horse even crashed into the horse trailer but just had a small cut from the corner of the trailer. The vet had him down on the ground and again, he jumped up, fell into a ditch. slipped again and fell again. When he got up this time, he fell and broke his leg. He had to be euthanized quickly. The owner was screaming, crying and just was inconsolable  We all felt her pain, no one wanted it to end like this.

My gut feeling when we arrived at the lady's farm was this horse was going to die. I surely wasn't going to say that to anyone and tried to get it out of my mind. As I was watching the whole gelding process, I felt surely I was wrong. It went so well. Was this God's way of preparing me for the sad outcome? It was horrible. I have relived it every night as I lay in bed trying to make some sense of it. Every intention was for a good, positive outcome. Why did this happen?

I really needed a good thing to happen. It has been 4 days now. I was still holding onto the sadness and pain. Now it is early Sunday morning and I opened an email about a horse needing a home, one of several I get daily.
Jazzy is blind and needs a loving home

Jazzy is very healthy but only a special person sees the beauty in a disabled horse.

It was a blind mare, owner going to college, parents can't care for to help. The owner loves the mare and wants safety for her. I looked on FaceBook and my dear friend, who loves blind horses was already posting and she is on Central time, earlier then it was here. I told her about the mare and she said 'YES'. It went wonderful, it was easy! It was good. Was it another of God's plans that we both were up early? Was it part of the Universe, the way it should be?  What ever the force , I believe! 

Thank you for believing in SaveTheHorses. 
You are our strength and 
your kindness is our most valuable possession.